Automotive

These Used Luxury Cars Are Cheap To Buy… But Maintenance Costs A Small Fortune

Las Vegas is one of the most fun places in the world. For anyone 21 and above, Las Vegas can be a true open-air playground. Nothing is more fun than checking in to a luxury hotel after dropping off a Lamborghini Aventador at the valet service. In fact, nobody wants to pull up to the Bellagio Hotel in a Honda Civic. Absolutely nobody. For ballers on a budget, it is always possible to do the same thing at Paris Hotel with a slightly older sports car.

RELATED: 10 Insanely Depreciated Supercars We’d Actually Buy

As time goes by, the vast majority of luxury cars tend to depreciate. Although there are some cars that will never depreciate, it is fair to say that over 70% of them can easily lose half their value over 15 years. With prices going down year after year, it is possible for commoners to finally get a hand on an absolute jewel that is otherwise reserved for the elite. Though these used cars are inexpensive, maintaining them will cost their owners an arm and a leg.

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1979 Porsche 928

1979 Porsche 928 Cropped

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Porsche is well-known for manufacturing some of the nicest German sports cars ever. As a matter of fact, Porsche was already ahead of the game back in the early 1900s. Ferdinand Porsche and his associate came up with the very first hybrid engine found on a driveable vehicle. As time went on, Porsche’s notoriety drastically improved. In the 1950s, James Dean was a proponent of Porsche race cars. Dean would eventually have a fatal accident that involved a Porsche 356.

1979 Porsche 928 2 Cropped

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The 1979 Porsche 928 is among those classic cars that are pure fun to drive. Despite its somewhat bad reputation, the 928 is not an ugly duckling. Underneath the hood sits a decent 4.7L V8 that churns out 295 hp at 5,900 rpm and 280 lb-ft of torque at 4,900 rpm. The 928 is definitely not the worst Porsche ever made. Despite its satisfactory specifications, a 1979 Porsche 928 can be purchased for less than $7,000. Maintaining this classic sports car is a different ballgame.

9
1991 Rolls Royce Silver Spur

1991 Rolls Royce Silver Spur Cropped

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The name Rolls Royce is synonymous with luxury, exclusiveness, and basically anything that pertains to the top 1%. However, Rolls Royce is also well-known for its airplane engines. During World War 2, British planes such as the Hawker Hurricane or Supermarine Spitfire were equipped with the Rolls Royce Merlin engine. Needless to say, if Rolls Royce could supply engines to the British military, it could easily produce handmade luxury cars.

1991 Rolls Royce Silver Spur 2 Cropped

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Back in 1991, Rolls Royce released the Silver Spur. With an MSRP of over $150,000, the car was not among the most accessible vehicle on the market. Fast forward 30 years, and the Silver Spur is worth as much as a 2010 Mustang GT. With that being said, a Rolls Royce remains a Rolls Royce no matter how old the car is. Finding parts for the Silver Spur is not that easy. Moreover, Rolls Royce parts can get expensive. For example, a used side mirror for the Silver Spur can cost over $150.

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1993 BMW 850ci

1993 BMW 850ci Cropped

Via mecum.com

Back in the 1970s, BMW started coming up with truly outstanding vehicles. The best part about these cars is that they were mass-produced. It was possible for practically anyone with the right amount of money to get a hold of a mean German machine. With the success of its M-Series in the 1980s, BMW tried to enter other segment of the markets with vehicles that were usually quite revolutionizing. During the 1990s, BMW’s Research & Development Department came up with astonishing vehicles.

1993 BMW 850ci 2 Cropped

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Back in the 90s, BMW released an absolute gem. The 850ci looked snazzy and packed enough power to put more established vehicles to shame. The smaller engine found on the 850ci is a monstrous 5.0L V12 that produces a respectable 296 hp at 5,200 rpm and 332 lb-ft of torque at 4,100 rpm. With the cheapest 850ci going for a little less than $14,000, the iconic coupe is quite affordable. Maintaining this bad boy will cost an arm and a leg though, given the fact that BMW no longer produces parts for the first 8-Series.

7
2001 Aston Martin DB7 Vantage

2001 Aston Martin DB7

Via classic.com

The British are well-known for their mind-blowing sports cars. Though they are not as popular as their Italian counterparts, they remain elegant and ready to hit the track. Thanks to movies like James Bond, British cars have maintained a very high status that Korean and Chinese cars are unlikely to achieve over the next 10 years. Despite their high status, some British cars simply lose value over time.

RELATED: 10 Classic Sports Cars That Lost Value In 2021

2001 Aston Martin DB7 Volante Cropped

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The Aston Martin One-77 is by far one of the most incredible Aston Martin cars made in recent years. This masterpiece of a supercar was preceded by equally admirable sports cars, such as the DB7 Vantage. Whether it is the coupe or the volante version, the DB7 was a huge hit upon its release back in the mid-1990s. The 2001 edition comes with the outstanding 5.9L V12 powerplant that develops 420 hp at 6,000 rpm and 398 lb-ft of torque at 5,000 rpm. Not bad for what was considered to be a high-end version of the Jaguar XK8. Aston Martins are handmade. Their parts sure do not come cheap.

6
2004 Volkswagen Phaeton

2004 Volkswagen Phaeton 2 Cropped

Via mecum.com

Volkswagen has to be the carmaker with one of the most interesting history. Created under Nazi Germany as the “car of the people,” Volkswagen grew to become one of the most powerful automotive groups in the world. There are several truly surprising facts about Volkswagen and its cars. Despite being at the center of a gigantic emissions scandal, the German automaker is still producing some of the most advanced vehicles out there.

2004 Volkswagen Phaeton Cropped

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The Volkswagen Phaeton was an epic failure. The car failed to conquer the hearts of sports sedan fans. Sold in the US only between 2004 and 2006, the Phaeton was far certainly not a hit. With only 1,433 units sold in 2004, the large German sedan was nowhere as popular as Lexus or Audi cars of the same caliber. Despite being equipped with a 6.0L W12 that churns out 444 hp at 6,050 rpm and 413 lb-ft of torque at 5,200 rpm. Some Phaetons are valued at less than $10,000, which is great news for German car fans. However, the Phaeton cost way more than a Golf to maintain.

5
2005 Mercedes-Benz CL65 AMG

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Back in the mid-50s, Mercedes-Benz came out with its revolutionary 300 SL Gullwing. Today, a restored Gullwing in terrific condition can go for hundreds of thousands of dollars. The Gullwing was not Mercedes’ only accomplishment. In the 1980s, the German car manufacturer released the infamous Hammer. The car was by definition a supercar killer dressed as a sedan. Over the last two decades, Mercedes’ AMG Series has shown that Germany still knows how to produce sporty and luxurious vehicles.

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When the 2005 Mercedes-Benz CL65 AMG was first released, it cost a little shy of $180,000. Equipped with a wild twin-turbocharged 6.0L V12, the high-end Mercedes coupe is far from being your auntie’s car. The powerplant makes 604 hp at 5,500 rpm and 738 lb-ft of torque at 3,000 rpm, the CL65 was one of the coolest top-line sports cars one could own back in 2005. A 2005 CL65 was featured on Bring A Trailer for a little less than $35,000. That is a real bargain for such a legendary car. However, a 6.0L V12 is not the cheapest engine to service.

4
2008 Audi S8

2008 Audi S8 Cropped

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Audi could easily be considered as the luxurious brand of a humongous automotive group. Owned by Volkswagen, Audi released some truly impressive vehicles over the last couple of decades. The S8 may not be as popular as the R8, but connoisseurs know how amazing the S8 is.

2008 Audi S8 2 Cropped

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Though the Audi S8 may not be among the best Audi sports cars ever made, it is quite a luxurious and powerful machine. The S8 comes standard with a serious 5.2L V10 that makes 450 hp at 7,000 rpm and 398 lb-ft of torque at 3,500 rpm. The same V10 is also found in the Lamborghini Gallardo of the same year. As if this was not a good enough reason to seriously consider buying a 2008 S8, Audi stopped putting V10s into its S8 after this generation. It is possible to find a used S8 in great condition for about $15,000 to $20,000. Despite being built with Volkswagen components, working full-time for $20 per hour will not allow you to maintain this great sports sedan.

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2008 Jaguar XKR

2008 Jaguar XK-Series XKR 2 Cropped

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To the vast majority of people, Jaguar rhymes with speed and luxury. The British carmaker knows how to produce somewhat affordable and majestic cars. Things were not always what they are today. When Jaguar was acquired by Ford motors in the early 2000s, Jaguar lost its attractiveness. Jaguar cars started losing their resale value. It is not until 2008, when Tata acquired Jaguar, that the cars started being mouth-watering once again.

RELATED: 10 Cars You’re Better Off Buying Used (Because Of Depreciation)

2008 Jaguar XK-Series XKR Cropped

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Despite having gone through some rough patches, Jaguar was able to recover its prestigious status. The XKR is a perfect example of Jaguar’s rebirth. On top of being classy, the coupe comes with a supercharged 4.2L V8 that develops a decent 420 hp at 6,250 rpm and 413 lb-ft of torque at 4,000 rpm. That is a lot of power for a snazzy British sports coupe. Originally costing a little over $90,000, several XKRs have been sold on Bring A Trailer for about $20,000 with low mileage. Jaguar cars are not known for being cheap to maintain.

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2008 Maserati Quattroporte

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When regular people think of Italian cars, they usually come up with the same names: Ferrari, Lamborghini, and Maserati. They often wrongly assume that all three brands are equal. Although Maserati could have once claimed the same status as Ferrari and Lamborghini, the Italian carmaker is now just another brand in the Stellantis automobile group.

2008 Maserati Quattroporte Sport GT 2 Cropped

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Maserati cars are now notorious for being the nouveau-riche, entry-level luxury car. Despite being equipped with decent engines and having interiors as beautiful as a five-star hotel, they tend to lose value rather quickly. The 2008 Maserati Quattroporte comes with a healthy 4.2L V8 that produces 400 hp at 7,000 rpm and 339 lb-ft of torque at 4,250 rpm. With an original MSRP of over $125,000, it is now possible to find 2008 models for about $20,000. Despite its low price, a 2008 Maserati will cost a substantial amount to keep in working condition.

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2008 Porsche Cayman S

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Several old Porsche cars are now very affordable. Classic Porsches are ultimate head-turners. However, Porsche cars released less than 20 years ago are far from being as expensive as they used to. The very first Porsche Cayenne can now be found for the same price as a used 2015 Honda Civic Si. The base Porsche Cayenne sure is not the dream car of most gearheads, but some people like it.

RELATED: These 9 Cars Depreciate Like Crazy

2008 Porsche Cayman S 2 Cropped

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The Cayman S sure is not the sexiest Porsche car released in 2008. It is nothing like the 911 GT2 released the same year. With that being said, the small Cayman S still packs quite a punch. The 3.7L flat-six cylinder powerplant cranks out 295 hp at 6,250 rpm and 251 lb-ft of torque at 4,400 rpm. The value of the Cayman S went from $60,000 in 2008 to about $30,000 in 2021. Though the car is worth as much as a base Toyota Camry, it is still the sort of car that only a successful dentist will be able to maintain.


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